MAC-World War III Review

mac-world-war-iii

By the time of this release, No Limit records had lost steam.  Reasons being that their neighborhood rival Cash Money had emerged on the scene with a fresh new NO bounce sound and fresh appeal from BG, Juvenile, Lil Wayne, and Turk. Mannie Fresh’s hot and greasy NO production took it back to the essence of the true NO culture whereas P and them seemingly lost footing in the mainstream.

No Limit had officially peaked in 1998. After several years of hard independent grinding and  the acquisition of Snoop Dogg.  P felt that he reached the mountain top of the music world and focused on his next moves to expand.  He  started focusing more on movies, clothing lines, managing athletes and even toys.

P “retired” after the release of his Last Don album but due to Cash Money’s sudden surge, He returned out of no where and dropped a new album. P’s return album Only God Can Judge Me was both a critical and listener disappointment. The releases from C-Murder, Silkk, Mia X, and the TRU album didn’t do the numbers as their successors which spelled trouble for No Limit.

The main problem wasn’t only Cash Money but that Beats by the Pound whom felt overworked and under paid had left No Limit around this time period. P started recruiting new producers and even producing to recapture that magic. Beats by the Pound had produced EVERY album on No Limit from 1995-1999 so they were burnt.

Production on the No Limit album’s post BBTP were met with hit and miss. It took a while for people to adapt to the transition but it clearly worked for Mac’s World War 3 album. Mac was possibly one of the most talented members of the No Limit roster. He had legit stripes in the streets, he came from the era of meaning what you say  in music which many related to him. Similar to Tupac, Mac had this gift.

Mac released his sophomore album titled World War III in the fall of 1999 and it was a true representation of not how not only Mac was feeling but also the No Limit camp as a whole. It was basically No Limit fighting against relevancy and taking on issues with different rappers and clicks. Death Row Records, Tha Outlawz, Pastor Troy, Cash Money, Yukmouth had takened swipes at No Limit throughout and Mac was the first itching to response. We Deadly is where Mac and P himself responded to all the non sayers about their standing in the streets and mainly Pastor Troy. P let him know that he “runs Atlanta”.

There aren’t as many “bangers” on this album due to Beats by the Pound leaving BUT that doesn’t stop Mac’s World War III album from being one of the best releases from No Limit. The production supplements Mac’s flow perfectly and he coasts throughout. You also get more in-depth of his personal life on Battle cry, Can You Love Me, and Best Friends which was a real life story of a friend turned enemy.  He also gives the ladies more of his sensitive side on the sequel to “Callin me ” with Still Callin Me”

There weren’t many guest appearances aside from the usual No Limit suspects but he worked with his own clique the Psychoward clique which had potential to bring No Limit back . D.I.G  and Magic both rapped their asses off on War Party and showed that the Tank had spitters at that time :

Overall this was one of the best albums of 1999. Unfortunately Mac wouldn’t be able to capitalize off as he would be sentenced to 30 year prison term. It would be the first of many blows No Limit would take as C-murder would be sentenced to life, Mystikal leaving, Snoop going back to Cali, and falling out with Soulja Slim. But World War III is a true testament of how talented Mac really was and we hoping he’ll be freed eventually.

Vic Rating: 9 outta 10

About Vic Da Rula

What more can I say? I enjoy Hip Hop, Sports, and living the good life! var a2a_config = a2a_config || {}; a2a_config.linkname = "Escobar300(Covering Hip Hop Culture, Sports, and Events)"; a2a_config.linkurl = "https://escobar300.wordpress.com/";
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