Classic Mc Ehit Interview:Talks about Quik beef, NYC gang banging, The direction of West Coast music etc

MC EIHT

ThaFormula.Com – It’s amazing how a track like The Hood Took Me Under was tha number one single in tha country seeing that you would never even hear a track that hardcore on tha radio nowadays?

MC Eiht – Definitely. Especially at tha time you know when Naughty By Nature was hittin’, Tribe, Eric B & Rakim was hittin’. It was alot of muthafuckas hittin’ so to have that song and for it to be tha number one song in tha country and everybody bangin’ that song and buying it, it was just overwhelming. It just let me know that tha shit really can happen.

ThaFormula.Com – How did you feel about tha Tim Dog diss track “Fuck Compton”?

MC Eiht – I took it a little personal because if you diss Eazy and NWA that’s your thang, but I just took it personal because it was a strike at Compton. Niggaz was mad because Compton was gettin’ on and doing their thang. Just like Brooklyn was doing their thang with Biggie and Jay-Z, niggaz just hated because Compton and what we represent. I guess nobody was feelin’ tha gang bang thang and couldn’t understand what was going on.

ThaFormula.Com – Did you feel that “Straight Checkn’em” did what it should have seeing that you had tha number one single in the country?

MC Eiht – I mean all my albums should have did better then what they did, but lack of promotion you know caused that. But as far as reaching tha niggaz in tha communities in tha hood, yeah it got to tha people that it needed to get to. I mean it did good. It sold 300,000 copies so for a nigga on his second album you know coming from tha hood in Compton it was very significant. I was getting my name out there. That’s all it was really about you know, just represent Compton.

ThaFormula.Com – Now how did you hook up with DJ premier for that “Def Wish II” remix?

MC Eiht – Like I said, I been knowing Premier since I first got started. My first concert and shit was with Premier. They did their first concert in L.A. out here with CMW. So I been knowing him ever since then. So we always kept in contact and then over tha years we toured together, did concerts together, all that. So from there we just kept a good relationship and then when it was time for me to get busy and I wanted to remix tha track, tha first person I thought of was Premier.

ThaFormula.Com – Now how about “One Life To Live.” How did you hook up with Pete on that Soul Survivor LP?

MC Eiht – Yeah Pete Rock, another one of tha homies I been knowing from way back in my early New York days. That was tight right there man. I always been a fan of Pete Rock. Pete Rock got those jazzy tracks that is just tha shit so when he asked me to get down on tha Soul Survivor project it was nothing.

ThaFormula.Com – That was a classic album but it seemed to have come out at a time when hip hop was really changing?

MC Eiht – Oh yeah, definitely. Everything went to bling blingin’ and you know Cash Money and you know big planes and big fur coats and platinum watches and Gold. Tha aspect kind of changed a little bit. I mean, I know we represented tha turf and we talked about police brutality, drive by’s, mad niggaz gettin’ jacked and killed, but it wasn’t just glorifying tha almighty dollar. Rap just got fucked up you know. I love it to tha position where I can represent where I’m from, but I don’t wanna glorify tha mighty dollar and just talk about how many planes I fly and you know this and that and all this other bullshit.

ThaFormula.Com – How did you feel about the “Were All In The Same Gang” project and do you wish you could have been involved with that?

MC Eiht – Well I did a project with Cube and DJ Pooh then called “The Fist” so I tried to get down with that. I participated in tha peace treaties and all that shit when tha niggaz came together and all that shit so it was a good aspect. I wish it could have kept going because it would have signified you know, tha west coast in a whole and we could have unified a little better you know. It was a good feeling at tha time to be able to ride around wherever.

ThaFormula.: Were there heavy comparisions between Compton’s most wanted and NWA?

MC Eiht – Yeah we got compared a little bit to NWA but Compton’s Most Wanted style was totally different from NWA, so we didn’t get that many comparisons. Just really with tha name only. You know they was NWA and we were CMW, but besides that I always had my own significant flow so it was a little bit, but not too much.

ThaFormula.Com – You guys were really tha only L.A. group that I can remember that were coming with a brand of hip hop that no one was even coming close to sounding like in tha West.

MC Eiht – Well basically I was more rounded with my music and didn’t just stick to tha typical thing. So I was able to branch off and collect fans abroad more, you know more or less in tha neighborhoods. Then you know being one of tha first significant West Coast artist to step in New York, you know I built foundations with alot of cats that was coming up back then. Like Nas, Guru, Premier, Busta, Method, Redman. So you know I knew alot of cats in New York before they came up. Like DJ Slip produced one of Fat Joe’s first records way back when Fat Joe first got started so we just had a significant foundation with cats in New York. I think that’s how we got more respect abroad and our sound was more different then a typical West Coast artist.

ThaFormula.Com – Yeah because I never heard anyone diss CMW in tha East that I can remember. Everyone from NWA to Quik got dissed at one time by someone in New York, but CMW seemed to get tha utmost respect from tha East?

MC Eiht – Yeah, I explored tha more street aspect you know. Eazy and them talked about tha neighborhoods and all that but Eazy and them was on a different track. I was more or less strictly street with it.

ThaFormula.Com – How did tha whole CMW crew come together and how long before you guys got your first deal?

MC Eiht – Basically CMW got started around junior high school. You know just hanging out, me and Chill starting at school battling niggaz and shit like that. You know it was just us wanting to be artists and just starving for tha aspect to get in tha studio. We just kept working and working and we bumped into DJ Slip. He had his own little studio, but you know he was trying to get his beats known. So we hooked up together. Me and Chill was going to Junior High together so we was friends before Compton’s Most Wanted started. When tha rap got heavy you know we just turned around and said we from Compton and we gonna be Compton’s Most Wanted and that’s how we gonna start it off.

ThaFormula.Com – Did you feel that first album got tha recognition it should have got?

MC Eiht – You know I ain’t never felt we got tha recognition that we deserved seeing that we were doing tha same shit that alot of other cats was doing, but we can’t get tha props. But you know I put that on corporate shit and that’s just tha way it happens.

ThaFormula.Com – The Boys In The Hood Soundtrack. How did John Singleton decide on CMW for tha lead single and how much of an impact did that make for CMW?

MC Eiht – Well I guess from him being around in tha streets and in L.A. and doing a movie, he knew of West Coast Underground artists that was coming up. At tha time you know tha Video Juke Box was real hot out here on the West Coast and I had my first single out which was “One time Gaffled Em Up” and tha video was playing real heavy. So I guess him being a fan of hip hop watching tha videos and shit, he had seen my video. So I was down with Da Lench Mob one day on tha movie set kicking it you know cause I used to hang with JDee from Da Lench real tough like everyday. So me and JDee was kicking it at tha movie set and I guess he recognized me and from there he was like man I seen your video and I like your shit. He said, you a real street nigga you know representing tha neighborhood. He told me, your perfect for this movie so that’s just how it came about. I thought he was bullshittin’ you know. I’m like, yeah right this movie muthafucka, whatever. But tha nigga called me up and bingo tha rest is history.

ThaFormula.Com – How did that change things for you and CMW?

MC Eiht – It put me on a national scale. It was a chance for people to really recognize CMW and set us aside from NWA and it gave us our own purpod to. Where you didn’t have to worry about you know these niggaz knowing you from when you gangbanged or whatever. So it was a good feeling.

ThaFormula.Com – What do you think stopped all that?

MC Eiht – What stopped it is that niggaz is men and even though there is unity, there is always gonna be a falling out and then sometimes you can’t control everybody’s reconciliation’s. Sometimes niggaz don’t wanna make it cool. You might of killed my brother or you might of killed my homie and sometimes niggaz just can’t let that live down, so within tha heat of animosity something is gonna happen and bingo the treaty is gonna be over with. Because tha minute these niggaz take off on y’all, y’all gonna go take off and everybody is gonna be back to shooting. Also they killed one of tha niggaz who started this shit who was trying to bring tha shit together. A major nigga from tha projects, they killed him so shit was just downhill from there. You always gonna have beefs within niggaz. You ain’t gonna be able to control every nigga in your neighborhood, because there is no leaders. Niggaz have their significant rep or stripes but there is no leader like in other places there is one nigga who leads tha gang. There is no leaders here. Nigga everyman for himself. You represent tha hood, you take care of your fellow man. I don’t tell you what to do, you don’t tell me what to do. Tha older niggaz might instruct tha younger niggaz on what to do but you still your own man. So that’s why it fell apart because niggaz don’t go for no unity for too long.

ThaFormula.Com – Things seemed to be looking cool for a minute. The Video Juke Box in L.A. seemed to be doing alot for tha Bloods & Crips, CMW, and basically anyone from tha streets looking to get in this hip hop thing?

MC Eiht – Oh yeah, tha Jukebox made a significant difference because that was tha best thing they could have did for young cats trying to get on because, you could sit at home and request your own video all day. Then that muthafucka is showing all over tha West Coast and all over tha country. They really killed us when they took tha Jukebox out because it was about people’s choice. It wasn’t about being programmed but about what you wanted. I think we need one of those stations again where a nigga can just sit up and order tha videos he wanna see. But you know that killed tha competition because why would you watch rap city or MTV, when you can sit up here and order what you wanna see. It put niggaz on because it really put me on. It put me on in states I didn’t even know about.

ThaFormula.Com – Next up came “Music To Drive by.” You connected with Scarface with that album. How was recording that LP?

MC Eiht – Yeah, I was making moves then. “Growing Up In The Hood” did a little good for us so you know I was able to get out on tha road, make a few moves and shit. Then it opened my eyes wider to tha seen of hip hop and what was going on. Being able to work with Scarface and be cool with tha Geto Boys and all that shit, it was all good. “Music To Driveby” was a significant album. It was my best album to date. A nigga got to open his guns up on that album and let loose. I got to create and do a little of my own production. That album was basically a collaboration of everybody’s frustration so that’s why it really got out good cause everybody got a chance to do something. Mike T got a chance to produce, I got a chance to produce, Slip got a chance and you know it was tha shit.

ThaFormula.Com – But again alot of samples. Was that a problem yet for CMW as far as clearance and all that?
MC Eiht – Never. You know we never had problems with samples because we didn’t go after shit that muthafuckas was hearing commonly. We wasn’t using tha George Clinton’s and tha Parliament and tha Bootsy and Zapp’s and all that. We was strictly doing shit like using tha Meters, Isaac Hayes and shit that you wouldn’t even think commonly about. We was sampling shit off of TV commercials and shit like that cause we was creative like that. You know me and Slip would sit up watching a TV commercial, hear a beat in tha background and be like fuck that. We would sit up all night and wait till tha commercial came back on ready with tha SP 1200 to sample tha shit you know. We was creative like that so we didn’t have problems with clearing samples because basically shit we used was early 50’s and 60’s shit.

ThaFormula.Com – Yeah tha way you flipped tha Isaac shit on “Hood Took Me Under” was bangin’ and everytime I hear that “Straight Checkn’em” LP, I notice how you were tha first to use certain samples before anyone.

MC Eiht – Yeah that little Isaac Hayes sample everybody used after me. Alot of cats used that record after me. I was tha first nigga to use a gang of records. I was tha first nigga to use tha Isley Brothers shit and then Cube used it. Niggaz took “Straight Checkn’em” home and said I’m fittin’ to do this, but it was cool man. It was lovely and just showed me that alot of niggaz was listening to Eiht and CMW. We wasn’t tha average gangsta rappers. Niggaz was musically inclined and knew what was crackin’.

ThaFormula.Com – Now one of tha questions that people ask all tha time is what exactly went down between you and DJ Quik and how serious did that beef really get?

To Be Continued…Click Here For Part II!!!

ThaFormula.Com – How did you get hooked up with “Menace II Society” and end up with another hit single?

MC Eiht – Well the Hughes Brothers, once again local town niggaz livin’ in Pomona knew about Eiht. I was on my third album so they had seen videos and knew about me. So for them to film a West Coast movie, they wanted to use characters from tha West Coast to fill out tha part and originally my part was for MC Ren and I guess he couldn’t pull it off and that’s when they me in. I read for tha part. They called me in again and I read again. From there, bingo they gave me tha part. Then from doing tha movie and being on tha set everyday and going through tha experience and already knowing what tha movie was about, it was easy for me to come up with tha song.
ThaFormula.Com – Did you get offered any more movie roles after that?

MC Eiht – Not really. After that I got offered a few movie roles, but I guess tha people still wasn’t ready for me. I mean I got offered tha role in Money Talks with Chris Tucker and Charlie Sheen. I got offered a part in a Rodney Dangerfield movie but I turned that down. I turned down basically about four roles because they didn’t fit what I was doing. I didn’t wanna stray from tha character or tha real life situations I played in Menace. I didn’t wanna start doing comedy shit! I didn’t wanna transition into that at tha time. Even though acting is acting and that’s all you doing, I just still didn’t wanna transition into that other role so I turned down alot of movies. It was all good though because I got alot of soundtracks.

ThaFormula.Com – Next up you came with MC Eiht Ft. CMW. “We Come Strapped” was very different then tha past CMW albums in that it was less samples and more original music right?

MC Eiht – Right, that was more original production. That’s when everybody started talking about tha sampling and what everybody was using. So basically, I just sat down and we just played most of tha shit. Niggaz smoked some blunts, kicked back, let tha shit come to him and just jumped on tha keyboard and started playing shit. Slip was already musically inclined, so basically it was perfect.

ThaFormula.Com – It was definitely a whole new sound for hip hop. You guys seemed to have jumped on tha heavy keyboard production way before most were doing it.

MC Eiht – Right. We was like fuck sampling. Let’s just start playing our shit. Now you know alot of niggaz play they shit now. But back then, alot of niggaz wasn’t doing it.

ThaFormula.Com – What made you decide to go solo after tha CMW albums?

MC Eiht – Basically, tha transition of doing Menace II Society and doing tha song for tha movie made tha company feel like more people was ready to accept MC Eiht then CMW. So it was a decision to name tha record MC Eiht Ft. CMW, so we could broaden tha horizon for MC Eiht more. People were comfortable with MC Eiht from Menace II Society and you know I did alot of press and alot of touring. So everything was MC Eiht. It was never CMW which I question alot, but you know how companies do it. They always try to find an angle to work another gimmick and that’s what they did.
ThaFormula.Com – How did tha rest of tha group feel about that?

MC Eiht – Tha rest of tha niggaz was cool because I still incorporated them in tha record.
Basically it was tha same thing except that name switched. We was all still there and people excepted it. Then it became 2 different entities and then we can run with that to because now, we can do a CMW record and then MC Eiht can do a solo album. Just like with Eazy and NWA back in tha day. How Eazy did solo records and then he still did group records with NWA.

ThaFormula.Com – After that you came with “Death Threatz” and “Last Man Standing.” What made you break from Epic records after that?

MC Eiht – Basically “Death Threatz” was on it’s way to becoming another good record, but political shit within tha company forced them to pull tha record off of tha shelves because of some dispute they got into with tha retailers. So they basically killed my project at about 300,000 copies. It kind of really pissed me off because I didn’t understand what happened. They was telling me there was a problem with tha record in that there was a scratch in tha record or something. There was no scratch in tha record though. Basically they had offered tha retailers a deal and when tha record got to flying off of tha shelves, they wanted to kill tha deal and take it back up to tha regular price. Tha retailers didn’t wanna pay it because they had wanted that deal that Sony offered. So you know tha record got sabotaged. Epic didn’t wanna restock non of tha retailers because tha retailers wanted it at tha same price and Epic didn’t wanna give it to them at that price. So nobody reordered and it basically killed tha record. So “Last Man Standing” was just a free kick to them because I was so frustrated with them and wanted to be off of tha label. They came with tha 1.5 million deal right after “We Come Strapped.” Basically I was on my last 2 albums and coming off of a platinum album, they wanted to resign me for 5 more albums. I wasn’t going for that though. Fucking with a company who I felt didn’t treat me right my whole career that I was over there and now that I get a platinum record off of tha success of a movie which they didn’t have shit to do with. In fact, if it wasn’t for Menace I would be in tha same position. So I didn’t feel like they deserved more records. I didn’t give a fuck how much money they was offering and I was a young cat back then in ’95. Offering a nigga a million and a half dollars, any nigga would have jumped on it, but I didn’t. I just knew that there was better shit down tha road. I didn’t wanna be one of those you know, just take tha money and run niggaz. So I refused to sign tha contract, therefore tha last 2 records didn’t do shit. So I said fuck it and was ready to move on.
ThaFormula.Com – So what did you do from there?

NC Eiht – So I signed a deal with Big Beat Atlantic but I never put a record out over there. Now I did a record on my group NOTR and we had did a whole album and video for them. But they never released tha record because at tha time Time Warner was coming under fire for all tha bitches and hoes and fuck tha police shit in gangsta rap. So that’s when Time Warner was threatening to pull Interscope’s distribution. They even dropped Death Row. So when Interscope got dropped, Atlantic got scared and they didn’t wanna do anything that represented tha streets. But I had signed a production deal with them for my solo albums, CMW albums and another group album. I had tha lives of like seven niggaz in my hands and for them to sit up a whole year and wait on this money and wait to get in tha game, just to hear them go well we are not gonna fuck with y’all because we don’t wanna fuck with gangsta rap, it really destroyed everything. It kind of fucked up shit with me because if that was tha case, I could have took tha money from Epic and said fuck it! But I’m thinkin’ shit is gonna be greater down tha line. I get with Big Beat and they straight fuck a nigga. They didn’t even want a nigga to get busy. They wanted to bring in other niggaz to produce my tracks. But it was all good. They didn’t respect my gangsta, they didn’t respect what I was doing. They wanted to transform me into a showpiece. They wanted me to do collabos with girls. They wanted me to do songs about being in tha club chillin’ and all that shit. But I wasn’t with that shit so my deal got dropped. But it’s cool because now they are over there thugged out. You got Fat Joe, Trick Daddy, Twista. It’s cool to be a thug now.

ThaFormula.Com – How do you look at things now when you see all these “Gangsta Rappers” coming out of tha East Coast now?

MC Eiht – It’s funny because tha East Coast picketed gangsta rap. They picketed tha shit so hard. It was a gimmick to them. They would say all them niggaz do is talk about shooting each other up and wearing colors and shit. But it’s so funny now cause in New York niggaz is gang bangin’. Niggaz is bloodin’ in New York. Look at tha Dip Set. They claiming that they bloods. They are wearing red rags and fucking with Game from Compton who is a blood and throwin’ up B’s and all that shit and that shit is crazy. I mean we couldn’t do that shit back then. They laughed at us for that and it’s so funny because you go back 7 or 10 years ago and they was laughing at us. But see tha niggaz that is doing it right now, them niggaz are kids. Niggaz like 50 Cent, Lloyd, Jim Jones, Camron. Camron back then was straight “Horse & Carriage.” It was about girls butt naked in tha pool, but now it’s about wearing rags and I’m from tha hood and from tha block. It was a gimmick. Them niggaz was watching us do that shit and was getting fascinated. So when they got old enough to see that being a hood nigga was tha shit, now they turn around and go nigga we from tha hood. What hood though? Brooklyn is not a hood. Harlem is not a hood. Since when has Harlem been tha hood. It’s rough out there. I been there. Walked up and down 125th and all through Harlem, through Brooklyn. I’ve caught tha train, walked and all that shit. I mean I been in tha projects no doubt. But niggaz never called they shit tha hood. But it’s open season now. I mean I respect Shyne. Fat Joe and them been hood niggaz to me. Capone & Noreaga and you know there is alot of niggaz that are in New York that’s hood. But there wasn’t so many niggaz who glorified that was gettin’ on. Niggaz didn’t get on by sayin’ we pop niggaz and we bang and we from this and that. Niggaz didn’t get on in New York like that, but you know I guess niggaz was tired of hearing Ja Rule singing and shit. It took one nigga to come in and say fuck that shit, this is how we gonna be. We gonna wear tats and bullet proof vests and talk about how we slang on tha block and how I chill with crips & bloods. Then bingo, they sell 6 million records.

ThaFormula.Com – Is watching this what made you decide to come back in tha game?

MC Eiht – Definitely. Just seeing omens and signs you know. I would be sitting at home and a nigga will mention me in his interview or I would be reading a magazine and a nigga would mention me in an interview. I’ll be watching a video channel and get mentioned again. You know I was just seeing signs and then all this shit that niggaz is doing is West Coast shit. Tha beats, tha slang, tattoos, bulletproof vests. All that shit is West Coast. So from that I just said it’s time to get back in tha game significant because they are doing our shit and they getting way more recognition off of tha shit. Recognize where you got that shit from.

ThaFormula.Com – How long ago did you decide on this man?

MC Eiht – About 2 years ago. Basically, I just been in tha
streets for tha last 2 years. I had to come up out tha house and go back to tha streets and just hang out with niggaz all day in tha backyards, frontyards with tha pit bulls, blowing blunts on tha corner. You know just chillin’ and ridin’ through tha neighborhoods hangin’ out at tha lowrider contests and just dippin’ and fuckin with hood rats. I had to get back into that element because if you ain’t in that element, then your whole game gonna be different. You will be sitting talking about, yeah I chilled in a big house all day getting my feet wet in tha pool and all that shit. I ain’t on that aspect. I’m gonna tell niggaz what’s really going on in tha streets still. You have to experience what goes on in tha streets for you to be able to communicate with tha niggaz on that level. I ain’t trying to reach tha muthafuckaz that is doing good and know what’s up. I’m trying to reach tha muthafuckaz that struggling to get there, so that’s what it’s about.

ThaFormula.Com – So with tha new album “Veterans Day” you hooked back up with Chill right?

MC Eiht – Yeah, Chill was trying his hand on production. You know he did some tracks for Snoop. So we just got down together and basically just a 2 man team because I didn’t wanna be running all across town and across states trying to put this record together. I wanted it to be a simple nice early rendition of CMW. Also Chill been fucking with me for so long so he knows what I get down to. It was just a good collaboration.

ThaFormula.Com – Now one of tha questions that people ask all tha time is what exactly went down between you and DJ Quik and how serious did that beef really get?

MC Eiht – That was some real shit.

ThaFormula.Com – Alot of people always wonder how that beef finally ended up being squashed?

MC Eiht – Basically we was bumpin’ heads in different places and then some shit happened one night at a club. A few of my homies got into it with some of his homies and shit got real violent. So from there I guess it was just always a mutual thing between camps that niggaz need to squash tha shit. By me knowing Snoop and him fucking with Snoop, Snoop kind of like orchestrated tha shit. He told me that he was fuckin’ with Quik one night cause you know I was hangin’ with Snoop alot between my Epic and Big Beat deal when I was homeless. So I was chillin’ with Snoop alot at his house working on shit cause that’s when he had first started working with Master P. So from there you know him working with Quik fucking with Death Row and everything, he was just like yeah man you know niggaz said everything is cool and whatever. So from there they was doing some kind of BET special and they called and asked Snoop and me to be on tha show with Tavis Smiley and then they also called Quik in. So I think that’s how it was orchestrated. So we hooked up at tha show and taped tha show and after that all tha beef was squashed and it was all good.

ThaFormula.Com – How do you look at that beef now and those tracks that you guys did on each other?

MC Eiht – I mean it was a beef. It was significant and it wasn’t no radio gimmick. It wasn’t about selling no records. It was some real shit and it was just fortunate that niggaz didn’t have to come to gunplay or nothing serious like that. Alot of people think y’all do beefs because he don’t like y’all rap style or whatever. Quik was a Blood and I was a Crip and everybody knew that. So basically that was one strike right there. Then you know him trying to represent where he’s from and me representing where I’m from and then we got tha voice of tha music and tha microphone behind us, so tha shit was powerful. It was just fortunate that nothing became to serious and nobody lost their life. Then I think with tha shit that was going on between Biggie and Pac and all tha other rap beefs that was going on, niggaz was going fuck it I wanna live to see tomorrow. Basically that’s how it got down.

ThaFormula.Com – How did you feel when you heard “Dollaz N’ Sense” from Quik?

MC Eiht – He did Dollaz off of a sound track and then I did a song on “Death Threatz.” After that I was done with it. We went back & forth for a while man. He did his shit, I did “Def Wish”, he did his shit, I did “Def Wish II”, he did his shit, I did “Duck Sick”, he did his shit, I did “Niggaz that Kill” & “Tap That Azz.” You know I did alot of songs.

ThaFormula.Com – You and Muggs made some classic tracks together man. How do you feel about your work with him?

MC Eiht – I’ve always been a fan of Muggs since tha 7A3 days when he was in New York. They had a song called “Coolin In Cali” and that’s what sold me on Muggs back then. Ever since then I just always followed tha niggaz music. It was just respect. He started working with Cypress Hill and I got down with Cypress Hill on tha “Throw Your Hands In The Air” remix with Red & Meth. Then I did “Prelude To A Come Up” with B-Real on Tha next Cypress Hill album. Then I got down with tha Soul Assassins album and then Muggs produced like 3 or 4 tracks on “Last man Standing” so me and Muggs was all good.

ThaFormula.Com – You seemed to be one of tha few West Coast MC’s that had perfect chemistry with most of tha top East Coast producers or tha East Coast production style in general?
MC Eiht – Yeah, I have alot of respect for tha East Coast. I grew up on EPMD, Eric B & Rakim, Treacherous 3, Sparky D, Schooly D, Fat Boys, Kurtis Blow, Run. That’s all I listened to until Eazy and NWA came in tha picture and a nigga was making street tapes listening to Toddy Tee and Mixmaster Spade. So you know I grew up on East Coast niggaz and all that early New York shit so I was able to make tha transition from rappin’ on West Coast beats because all I used to practice to was East Coast shit. That’s why is was so easy to rap to tracks by Muggs, Pete Rock and Premier. I grew up on that shit and know that shit. That’s why I think I get respect from alot of niggaz in New York. Even though I represent that West Coast, niggaz know I can get down with them in a heartbeat. Wu Tang Clan called me all tha way from California just to come sit and be in their video “Can It All Be So Simple.” It’s just respect from niggaz like that and you got to have that. When you have that, then you will be all good. If you don’t have respect from niggaz you will have alot of frustration in this game. Your gonna have alot of difficult times ahead. Every nigga you ain’t gonna like in this game but some niggaz you can say shit about and some niggaz you just have to respect and keep your mouth closed. That’s what happens. You pick at tha right niggaz, you keep your foundations, you keep your shit cool with niggaz and you gonna make it in this game. That’s where longevity comes from. That’s why I been able to be in this game for so long.

ThaFormula.Com – So what should people expect from tha new album “Veterans Day” and what are you hoping happens with it?

MC Eiht – Well from this new album man, I’m just trying to reintroduce myself to niggaz who didn’t think that real gangsta shit was still out there. Just trying to make a significant point with this record to give niggaz a refresher course from all that bling blingin’ and hip drillin’ and bullshit that don’t make no sense. You know fake niggaz you know who are runnin’ around claiming sets and throwing up blood signs and wearing rags when I been going to New York for tha last 12 years and never seen gang bangin’ until a couple of years ago. So this album is just to reintroduce people to somebody who is original and came from that era. Niggaz was tellin’ me man when are you gonna make a record because I’m getting so tired of hearing all this singing. Now fake gangsterism is taking over and we just can’t take it. So that was tha reason for me doing this record.

ThaFormula.Com – It seems like a lost cause though man.

MC Eiht – Yeah, but I’m not gonna compromise myself and my foundation and my fans just to be something I ain’t. Just to get on MTV or TRL or get a Grammy or be at tha BET awards. Man FUCK THAT!! I ain’t gonna compromise shit. I rather tha niggaz who know me tell me to keep it real then some motherfucker trying to give me a check for a Sprite commercial. I mean cause I remember when niggaz wouldn’t do shit like that. Nigga I ain’t fittin’ to do no Sprite commercial or no Right Guard commercial. I know it’s all about getting your bread and all, but niggaz had alot more integrity back then. You could have never got Chuck D to do a Right Guard commercial or Sprite commercial. Again, I understand it’s about getting paid because I’m about getting paid to, but I’m not about compromising my image to muthafuckaz. I’m not about compromising my true foundation cause muthafuckaz gonna question me. Just like I’m representing tha streets, a muthafucka gonna question me if I come out in a movie standing next to Rodney Dangerfield looking like a clown. They trust gonna be broken like damn, we thought Eiht was real for us. So that’s what it’s about, not compromising. Get your money and get paid and do what you gotta do, but if your on that aspect of being a real nigga, don’t compromise shit.

ThaFormula.Com – So when is tha album dropping and what else you got lined up Eiht?

MC Eiht – Tha album drops September 28th. Right now me and Chill are working on a record right now called ECMP meaning Eiht & Chill Making Paper. We are also working on tha new CMW record. Then I got a group called Gang Unit that I’m working on. It’s like me and a gang of niggaz. You know one of those classic group records and you know just trying to give niggaz they shine. So that’s what I’m trying to do right now. You know I got this distribution deal with Ryko so basically we just gonna try and blow it out, do what we can do and hopefully get some corporate backing so I can really put niggaz out there. But right now we just trying to make a significant stand on tha independent scale starting off with my record. Alot of niggaz will hold off for that corporate dollar instead of going independent but fuck that corporate dollar. I’ll take some change until that dollar comes because I keep stacking up that change and before you know it, you open that change box and you got alot of change. So that’s how I do it. If somebody see me and see me doing what I’m doing and they feel like they wanna ride this wave and they wanna be a real partner and make some real money on this real West Coast, I’ll introduce them to it. Because there is other niggaz out here other then Snoop, Dre, & Cube who have significant followings. Like Me & WC you know who have that following and are true real niggaz. I took it back to independent because then I could stretch my wings. I ain’t gotta worry about a nigga whispering around tha corner going wow is he gonna do this or sell this much. I’m gonna show you what I can do on my own and I’m gonna build from there.

About Vic Da Rula

What more can I say? I enjoy Hip Hop, Sports, and living the good life! var a2a_config = a2a_config || {}; a2a_config.linkname = "Escobar300(Covering Hip Hop Culture, Sports, and Events)"; a2a_config.linkurl = "https://escobar300.wordpress.com/";
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3 Responses to Classic Mc Ehit Interview:Talks about Quik beef, NYC gang banging, The direction of West Coast music etc

  1. Skeet says:

    Real Solid G… Straight Checkn Em Was my 1st rap tape for my 13th B-Day in 91! Played that shit so much it popped and I bought it 2 more times. EIHT IS A LEGEND From Music to Driveby, We Come Strapped, Death Threatz even when he did that Section 8 album under Mack 10 label… He even influenced Ice Cube with Today was a Good Day. Cubes best song and hit ever as far as mainstream. The Realist Westcoast G/Rapper💯 EIHT

  2. Luke says:

    Just wondering why you totally skipped over the whole hoo-bangin era like it didnt even happen. That was some of the best shit eiht ever did. It was definitely the cleanest and tightest production he ever had. Personally section 8 is my favorite eiht album. Wouldve liked to hear more about that period. Was he so pissed at Mac 10 he didnt want to speak on that? We got the whole story of his career but we never found out why he left hoo bangin and what happened there. Good interview overall tho.

    • Vic Da Rula says:

      Good question. I remember hearing one of those cats at Hoo Banging saying that Mack got overwhelmed. He was signing a bunch of real street cats and running a label, setting budgets, and taking care of cats went over his head. It was more of a headache than he thought.

      As for Eiht.. Im gonna definitely ask him that when we do a show with him in the future

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